PAWNEE REPUBLICAN c. July 17, 1941 (SEE PREAMBLE IN PRIOR POST)

HEADLINES: Floods and Windstorms Over Entire County - Nemahas and Turkey Creek Waters Raise to New Levels As Bucketing Rains Flood Every Area. Accompanied by Some Hail
STEINAUER COMMUNITY SUFFERS GREATEST
DAMAGE c. July 12, 1941

Pawnee City No Exception When Small Twisters Wreck Trees And Buildings in Many Sections. RESULTS IN HEAVY DAMAGE TO CROPS AND LIVESTOCK
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All Pawnee County is still attempting to pull out of the mire as one of the worst general rain and wind storms in years flooded every drainage urea Sunday night Monday morning, leaving thousands of dollars’ worth of damage to crops and livestock in its wake.

With the rain that poured down in cloud-burst proportions, came high winds and small twisters, adding to the destruction on higher ground where flood waters did not reach. Pawnee City experienced its first cyclone.
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Hardest hit by the flood was Steinauer and vicinity where a seven inch downpour sent Turkey Creek raging to the edge of the business district and swept away livestock, poultry and out- buildings.

For the first time since it has reached its present level, the north fork drainage ditch of the Nemaha was bank full and over- flowing in many places. It rose 28 feet and torrential rains at Tecumseh and northwest held it to that level until late Monday evening.

Because of rail washouts on the Rock Island at Steinauer, the! Burlington at Tecumseh and Kinney (near Liberty in Gage Co.), every community in the county has been without rail transportation and; mail service. Likewise, truck and auto traffic was at a stand-still as the Nemaha and Turkey Creek swept highways 4 and 50 in several places.

Although rain has been genera! over several states, southeast Nebraska and southwest Iowa were in the worst flood area. In southeast Nebraska the area Included Nuckolls, Thayer, Jefferson, Gage, Pawnee, Richardson, Johnson and Nemaha counties. From Beatrice to Marysville, the Blue river was on one of its worst rampages and Tuesday the Kansas town was experiencing a terrific ordeal with several hundred families vacating their homes as the oncoming waters rolled southward in rising furry. Fortunately, in the Nebraska and Kansas area, no loss of human life had been reported.
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The storm was the heaviest in the vicinity of Steinauer, where the rainfall aggregated seven to eight inches. Water poured Into Turkey Creek until the usually placid stream was a raging torrent, racing through lumber yard, washing out the scales and the south foundation of the building and sweeping a new granary downstream several miles. The loss at the Steinauer Mill was probably greatest and is estimated at between $1,000 to $1,500- The engine room was a sea of mud and some 900 bushels of wheat was destroyed or rendered unfit for market. (West end of town dike broke.)

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Urich and three children and John Urich and his mother,
Mrs. Ida Steinauer Urich (dau. of Nicholas Steinauer), barely escaped being washed away.The Urlch's lost a cow, two calves and 450 chickens. The Loren Ray, Don Vistuba, Lawson Anderson and Roy Templeton families and Mrs. Anna Hoffman were forced to vacate their homes. Besides mill damage, Schroffs lost about 200 young chickens, a barn and a truck was badly damaged. N. A. Steinauer lost two head of brood mares.*** Three oil tanks, one at the mill, two belonging to L. E. Mathews, of Pawnee City, were swept several rods downstream. (Used by Fred Hoffman)

***The water even caught one of the his....Nick’s horses. She was on some higher ground all tangled up in barbed wire. She later died from the bruises she had received from the floating logs in the current. This fast horse belonged to Jerry Steinauer who used to ride it east and west of town. (Chuck Obrist 2/8/1991)
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It was one of the heaviest rain storms' Pawnee County has witnessed in years and Turkey Creek reached highest point since 1908.
(The attached photo of the mill might have been about that time....1908…not in 1941.)
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PAWNEE REPUBLICAN  c. July 17, 1941 (SEE PREAMBLE IN PRIOR POST)

HEADLINES: Floods and Windstorms Over Entire County - Nemahas and Turkey Creek Waters Raise to New Levels As Bucketing Rains Flood Every Area. Accompanied by Some Hail
STEINAUER COMMUNITY SUFFERS GREATEST 
DAMAGE c. July 12, 1941

Pawnee City No Exception When Small Twisters Wreck Trees And Buildings in Many Sections. RESULTS IN HEAVY DAMAGE TO CROPS AND LIVESTOCK
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
All Pawnee County is still attempting to pull out of the mire as one of the worst general rain and wind storms in years flooded every drainage urea Sunday night Monday morning, leaving thousands of dollars’ worth of damage to crops and livestock in its wake.

With the rain that poured down in cloud-burst proportions, came high winds and small twisters, adding to the destruction on higher ground where flood waters did not reach. Pawnee City experienced its first cyclone.
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Hardest hit by the flood was Steinauer and vicinity where a seven inch downpour sent Turkey Creek raging to the edge of the business district and swept away livestock, poultry and out- buildings.

For the first time since it has reached its present level, the north fork drainage ditch of the Nemaha was bank full and over- flowing in many places. It rose 28 feet and torrential rains at Tecumseh and northwest held it to that level until late Monday evening.

Because of rail washouts on the Rock Island at Steinauer, the! Burlington at Tecumseh and Kinney (near Liberty in Gage Co.), every community in the county has been without rail transportation and; mail service. Likewise, truck and auto traffic was at a stand-still as the Nemaha and Turkey Creek swept highways 4 and 50 in several places.

Although rain has been genera! over several states, southeast Nebraska and southwest Iowa were in the worst flood area. In southeast Nebraska the area Included Nuckolls, Thayer, Jefferson, Gage, Pawnee, Richardson, Johnson and Nemaha counties. From Beatrice to Marysville, the Blue river was on one of its  worst rampages and Tuesday the Kansas town was experiencing a terrific ordeal with several hundred families vacating their homes as the oncoming waters rolled southward in rising furry. Fortunately, in the Nebraska and Kansas area, no loss of human life had been reported.
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The storm was the heaviest in the vicinity of Steinauer, where the rainfall aggregated seven to eight inches. Water poured Into Turkey Creek until the usually placid stream was a raging torrent, racing through lumber yard,  washing out the scales and the south foundation of the building and sweeping a new granary downstream several miles. The loss at the Steinauer Mill was probably greatest and is estimated at between $1,000 to $1,500- The engine room was a sea of mud and some 900 bushels of wheat was destroyed or rendered unfit for market. (West end of town dike broke.)

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Urich and three children and John Urich and his mother, 
Mrs. Ida Steinauer Urich (dau. of Nicholas Steinauer), barely escaped being washed away.The Urlchs lost a cow, two calves and 450 chickens. The Loren Ray, Don Vistuba, Lawson Anderson and Roy Templeton families and Mrs. Anna Hoffman were forced to vacate their homes. Besides mill damage, Schroffs lost about 200 young chickens, a barn and a truck was badly damaged. N. A. Steinauer lost two head of brood mares.*** Three oil tanks, one at the mill, two belonging to L. E. Mathews, of Pawnee City, were swept several rods downstream. (Used by Fred Hoffman)

***The water even caught one of the his....Nick’s horses.  She was on some higher ground all tangled up in barbed wire.  She later died from the bruises she had received from the floating logs in the current. This fast horse belonged to Jerry Steinauer who used to ride it east and west of town.  (Chuck Obrist  2/8/1991)
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It was one of the heaviest rain storms Pawnee County has witnessed in years and Turkey Creek reached highest point since 1908.
(The attached photo of the mill might have been about that time....1908…not in 1941.)

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Unfortunately, many of you may not recognize the family names who suffered personal losses of animals and the like in the 1941 Flood. You may need to check with your older family members if they remember them.

First time I have heard of the town Kinney, Nebr. by Liberty, Nebr. Which way was it located from Liberty? Armor & Bookwalter were in Pawnee Co. east of Liberty, not to far.

STEINAUER FLOODED ---- JULY, 1941 (STORY ABOVE)

Recent Nebraska flooding reminded me of this history.

Story attached ABOVE from the Pawnee Republican.Details the major story that hit the whole of Pawnee Co., but the worst flooding in Steinauer. Editor amazed
at the fact a tornado had hit over/near Pawnee City.

Apart from the heavy rain, most damage worse due to the dike on the west edge of town broke. It ran from the north end of Nick/Norbert Steinauer's farm yard to the the Rock Island tracks. Not sure when it was originally built. Over the years it has self-eroded and not much of a water buffer. Lack of flood threat now from the Turkey Creek, and Rock Cree that joins south of old RR track seems to be to due flood control and water shed measures since 1955.

The last threat to the town was on Sat., June 16, 1954 when approx. 7-9 inches fell over nite at the wedding dance of Marilyn Obrist & Arthur Neukirch. Then water from the north end of town, from the slough through John Obrist's property, over flowed and ran south down through the Main Street area ankle deep or higher. After that the town financed a diversion ditch deep enough to run this water straight west to Turkey Creek.

As kids, since we lived just east across the street of the dike, it was our cowboy/Indian territory for play from one end to the other. One of the weeds grew tall and sturdy became our spears.

In 1991, my dad, Chuck Obrist wrote his story of the flood, his surveying that night with Nick Steinauer, and the personal damage to towns people.
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Turkey Creek water would often back up in the SW end of town trying to get past the RR bridge and track right of way. It then would run over the road between the RR track and bridge south of town.==========Turkey Creek also frequently flooded from the NW end of town & North Road, and moved up toward the K of C Hall, and the homes in the NW end of town. One was Gerald and Evelyn Obrist and forced 2-3 X to evacuate. As kid thought it fun to wade or ride bike in flood water. Once remember Joan Frey coming to wade too.

3 weeks ago

Steinauer Community Heritage House

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ST. ANTHONY'S BELL RENOVATION - 2019

(This is an follow up piece to the bell renovation fund raising article in the Pawnee Republican of Jan. 3, 2019 which detailed the repairs needed.)

The mechanized bells were made possible in 1951 by several donors : Catherine Conradt in memory of her brother, John Conradt; Mr. & Mrs. Ignatius Kalin in their memory by the children; Mr. & Mrs. Nick Reuter by & in their memory. Their estate was instrumental in helping to pay down the major church debt in 1947 after the death of both of them in 1937; Mrs. Olive Kalin and son Edward in memory of their departed husband and father, Stephen A. He died suddenly July 21, 1950

Prior to this there were just two ropes that ran down through holes in the floors above to the rear of church. They were manually rung as needed by the ushers or older altar boys.

Pastor Msgr. Raymond L. Wageman, was very mechanically minded, and the one who made the climb to inspect the condition of the bells and made the decision to renovate them and switch to the to mechanized type and add the toller . The bells were activated by switches in the sacristy. He was always insistent that the alter servers rang the toller prior to and after a funeral mass.

Msgr. Wageman then introduced the ringing of the Angeles and the prayer that went with it at 12 noon & 6 PM. Over, time these came to mean you needed to quite play and be home for the meal.!! He would also ring the main bell at 5 minutes prior to Mass or other services. As a kid, the townspeople knew when they heard this, they had better be in church or on a fast trot to be make it there!

Bells have been integral to the look & sound of the church for 92 years; mechanized ones for 68. Up to now, thanks to many generous people, they are close to the $45,000 goal. Hopefully, as fund raising efforts continue, complete success is near.
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ST. ANTHONYS BELL RENOVATION  - 2019

(This is an follow up piece to the bell renovation fund raising article in the Pawnee Republican of Jan. 3, 2019 which detailed the repairs needed.)

The mechanized bells were made possible in 1951 by several donors : Catherine Conradt in memory of her brother, John Conradt;  Mr. & Mrs. Ignatius Kalin in their memory by the children; Mr. & Mrs. Nick Reuter by & in their memory. Their estate was instrumental in helping to pay down the major church debt in 1947 after the death of both of them in 1937; Mrs. Olive Kalin and son Edward in memory of their departed husband and father, Stephen A. He died suddenly July 21, 1950 
   
Prior to this there were just two ropes that ran down through holes in the floors above to the rear of church. They were  manually rung as needed by the ushers or older altar boys.

Pastor Msgr. Raymond L. Wageman, was very mechanically minded, and the one who made the climb to inspect the condition of the bells and made the decision to renovate them and switch to the to mechanized type and add the toller . The bells were activated by switches in the sacristy. He was always insistent that the alter servers rang the toller prior to and after a funeral mass.

Msgr. Wageman then introduced the ringing of the Angeles and the prayer that went with it at 12 noon & 6 PM. Over, time these came to mean  you needed to quite  play and be home for the meal.!! He would also ring the main bell at 5 minutes prior to Mass or other services.  As a kid, the townspeople knew when they heard this, they had better be in church or on a fast trot to be make it there!

Bells have been integral to the look & sound of the church for 92 years; mechanized ones for 68. Up to now, thanks to many generous people, they are close to the $45,000 goal. Hopefully, as fund raising efforts continue, complete success is near.

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As a member of the parish council the final cost will be more. All donations are greatly appreciated. Thank you!!!

Thank you for sharing this bit of history. Growing up a mile south of the church, often times we could hear the bells if we were outdoors. Good memories❤❤

How does one donate?

CIRCUS COMING TO TOWN - PAWNEE c. 1948

I remember my dad taking me @ 6 and maybe brother, Harold @ 4 to a circus. I am guessing we were in a big tent, maybe at the fair grounds. What I remember most was the elephants which had never seen in my life. At the end of their performance, they paraded out holding with their trunk the tail of the elephant ahead which just amazed me. This was always a vague memory until I saw the photos and knew it was not a fantasy. (DO ANY OTHER OF THE VIEWERS REMEMBER THIS CIRCUS IN PAWNEE????)

These photos are courtesy of Dave Herres and the Pawnee County History & Genealogy society.

I don't think many circus came to Pawnee often, so am almost sure these are the ones I saw. Dave's father was the Chevrolet dealer in Pawnee. As a promotion for his latest models, he seems to have cut a deal for the circus to bring the elephants down to his showroom to gather a crowd, and hopefully some would then come in to check out the latest models. The other vehicles in the photos are of interest too.
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CIRCUS COMING TO TOWN - PAWNEE c. 1948

I  remember my dad taking me @ 6 and maybe brother, Harold @ 4 to a circus. I am guessing we were in a big tent, maybe at the fair grounds.  What I remember most was the  elephants which had never seen in my life. At the end of their performance, they paraded out holding with their trunk the tail of the elephant ahead which just amazed me. This was always a vague memory until  I saw the photos and knew it was not a fantasy. (DO ANY OTHER OF THE VIEWERS REMEMBER THIS CIRCUS IN PAWNEE????)

These photos are courtesy of Dave Herres and the Pawnee County History & Genealogy society.

 I dont think many circus came to Pawnee often, so am almost sure these are the ones I saw. Daves father was the  Chevrolet dealer in Pawnee. As a promotion for his latest models, he seems to have cut a deal for the circus to bring the elephants down to his showroom to gather a crowd, and hopefully some would then come in to check out the latest models. The other vehicles in the photos are of interest too.Image attachmentImage attachment

1 month ago

Steinauer Community Heritage House

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2 months ago

Steinauer Community Heritage House

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Yellowstone wolf in winter.

Beautiful

Lawrence "Larry" Bstandig - March 14, 1948 ~ January 31, 2019 (age 70) Graduate of SHS 1966
His mother Esther was a granddaughter of Josephine Steinauer Kalin.
Larry was a graduate of St. Anthony's and Steinauer High.
28 year veteran of the Army Reserves. He was a member of the American Legion Table Rock Post 289, where he served as Commander for many years.
www.wherrymortuary.com/notices/Lawrence-Bstandig
Comprehensive obituary.
Photo: Larry, far (L) as TR Legion Commander at the dedication of the Pawnee Co. Veteran Memorial 11/10/2013
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Lawrence Larry Bstandig - March 14, 1948 ~ January 31, 2019 (age 70)   Graduate of SHS 1966
His mother Esther was a granddaughter of Josephine Steinauer Kalin.
Larry was a graduate of St. Anthonys and Steinauer High.
28 year veteran of the Army Reserves. He was a member of the American Legion Table Rock Post 289, where he served as Commander for many years.
https://www.wherrymortuary.com/notices/Lawrence-Bstandig
    Comprehensive obituary.
Photo:    Larry, far (L) as TR Legion Commander at the dedication of the Pawnee Co. Veteran Memorial 11/10/2013

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Sending my deepest sympathy💙

Sorry to hear loss of a love one. Prayers to the family

Great guy

Prayers

RIP

My grandmother Martha Conradt was Esthers Aunt so that made Esther my dad’s first cousin

3 months ago

Steinauer Community Heritage House

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Sign courtesy of Amazon.com: The Lizton Sign Shop Steinauer, Nebraska Aluminum America Flag Sign, USA Custom Flag Sign - 9"x36" by The Lizton Sign Shop $49.95 $ 49 95 + $7.00 shipping

Steinauer about 1910 from the School House hill. Nick Steinauer's house, Catholic Church in background. What is now the Wagner small home in foreground. Large Public School to far right, with large bell tower.. Unusual line of hedge. Appears to be a scattering of small animals vs bushes scatter the field...can't really tell. (Must click on photo to enlarge enough to appreciate the contents.) ... See MoreSee Less

Steinauer about 1910 from the School House hill. Nick Steinauers house, Catholic Church in background. What is now the Wagner small home in foreground. Large Public School to far right, with large bell tower.. Unusual line of hedge. Appears to be a scattering of small animals vs bushes scatter the field...cant really tell. (Must click on photo to enlarge enough to appreciate the contents.)

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That is a big school

STEINAUER BERNADT CARRIES ON FAMILY TRADITION
Bruce Bernadt

I began flying when about 6 years old with my dad. I began after my mom, Theoda=Toby Gottula, passed away in Jan. 1973. I flew in the right seat with dad . This is where Instructors sit when they train pilots. I continue to sit there when training student pilots as I do at the Tecumseh airport I teach them what my dad taught me: . Be Safe and think things through.

My dad began flying in about 1945 when 22. He continued to fly until he passed away in Jan. 1986. In that time he took us kids to California& Yellowstone Park several times. He owned a 170B before he owned the Cessna 182F. I still have it and am flying it yet today. I think my Dad would be very proud of me teaching people what he loved to do.
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Flour Drop Award: (Pix of Grand Champion trophy in plane)
The object is to hit a target on the ground with a bag of flour when you fly over. So to fly over you can't go slower than Best Glide an that is 65 MPH and no lower then 200 Feet AGL (Above ground level) with window open to drop bag of flour.
Need to have a bomb dropper and that is what Bailey Johnson did for me. She has never frown in a small plane before it was her first time. She did a great job. Flour drop plane Cessna 150.
(Award photo: Bruce Bernadt, Bailey Johnson, Matthew Christen Manger 9-22-18
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His aviation web site: www.bernadtaviation.com/
Bruce sometimes goes Live on his FB site when out flying:
www.facebook.com/bruce.bernadt.1
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Congratulations Bruce.

Very interesting

One of many things I have wanted to learn

U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps' 75th Anniversary is in 2018!

Steinauer High grads of 1944 were Bernadette Gottula and Dorothy Vrtiska. Joan Frey graduated in 1945. (If others, let me know.) They entered in the last 1945 enrollment and were trained at Creighton-St. Joseph's hospital in Omaha. This was a major break for rural girls to enter a profession they
otherwise could not afford. It obviously changed their whole lives and that of their family. I was told much encouragement to enroll for Dorothy V. came from her uncle, Major Lawrence F. Obrist who still active duty Army at the time as a chaplain up to Jan. 1946.(Click on pix & posters to view enlarged.)
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"United States Cadet Nurse Corps was established by the U.S. Congress on June 15, 1943. Its purpose was to ensure the country had enough nurses to care for its citizens at home and abroad during World War II.The Corps was supervised by the United States Public Health Service (USPHS).

The program was open to all women, including minorities, between the ages of 17 and 35, in good health, who had graduated from an accredited high school. Successful applicants were eligible for a government subsidy that paid for tuition, books, uniforms, and a stipend. In exchange, they were required to pledge to actively serve in essential civilian or federal government services for the duration of World War II.

The nursing schools were required to compress the traditional nursing program of 36 months to 30 months. Of the 1,300 schools of nursing in the country, 1,125 participated in the program. The Corps operated from 1943 until 1948, and during this period 179,294 student nurses enrolled in the program and 124,065 of them graduated from participating nursing schools. The federal government spent $160,326,237 on the nursing program.

The program was operational from 1943 to 1948, which included three enrollment periods, or fall terms: the first term was 1943, the second was 1944, and the third and final term was 1945. During this time, 179,294 student nurses enrolled in the program[44] and 124,065 of them graduated from participating nursing schools.[45]" (Wikipedia)
(Dorothy Vrtiska Pix is her Jan. 1948 graduation.)
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Nancy Gunzelman Loftus Margaret Gunzelman Haddixmarg Kathy Conradson

💖Nancy thank you for sharing! I am going to save this if you don't mind. Happy New Years!💖

Very interesting article

Cool! Thanks for sharing!

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4 months ago

Steinauer Community Heritage House

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So proud to call this my town I grew up in . What a beautiful picture

Beautiful!!

Postcard perfect! ♥️

Not sure of the source of graphic. Most of the trains in 1972 not running & the tracks through Steinauer show were abandoned. The top-left legend helps with UP, CB&Q & MOP=Missouri Pacific?? Remember as kid, 1952-54, would go to movie in Tecumseh on Sun. eve and then put sister, Marilyn Obrist Neukirch, on the train for Lincoln on Burlington about 10 PM. From the current Lincoln Station, she would take a cab to their apt. to be ready for a week's work ahead.(Click on photo to enlarge town labels.) ... See MoreSee Less

Not sure of the source of graphic. Most of the trains in 1972 not running & the tracks through Steinauer show were abandoned. The top-left legend helps with UP, CB&Q & MOP=Missouri Pacific?? Remember as kid, 1952-54, would go to movie in Tecumseh on Sun. eve and then put sister, Marilyn Obrist Neukirch, on the train for Lincoln on Burlington about 10 PM. From the current Lincoln Station, she would take a cab to their apt. to be ready for a weeks work ahead.(Click on photo to enlarge town labels.)

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From the 1890s on, the RR put the town in touch with anywhere in the world. A horse or car not needed to connect with the world. It opened the town to markets, goods shipped in, and salesmen who needed restaurants and hotel.

If I recall correctly, the Rock Island train through Steinauer and Mayberry was still running 3 times a week or so yet in 1963 when I still lived in Mayberry. Sometime after that they pulled up the tracks and sold right-of-way lands to adjoining farmers. I remember once when I was much younger my dad took the car into Pawnee City to have something major done on it and left it there and came home on the train... we used to wave at the guys in the caboose but that is the only time I recall anyone I know riding that train.

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